Columbus Pilgrimage Part 2:

After a very palatable lunch at Sweet Peppers Deli, my mommy and my deddy and I resumed our antebellum expedition by continuing on the Blue Tour. At Peppers, I had the most delectable thing on the menu (in my opinion…) the baked potato with cheese, bacon, butter…plethora of butter… and absolutely, positively, NO SOUR CREAM! I despise sour cream……One day, when I famous…I am going to walk into restaurants….they will seat me…and immediately serve me my baked potato with cheese, bacon, and extra butter…sans sour cream. I digress….

First Stop on the Blue Tour was Whitehall, circa 1843 two-story Greek-Revival Town House.  The current owners of Whitehall are Dr. and Mrs. Joe Boggess and family.

Mrs. Carol Boggess is the perfect Southern hostess, delightful storyteller, and just absolutely adorable!

This home has purple and red peek-a-boo glass surrounding the front entrance which allows people to see out, but not in.

The Boggess family has the bag containing all of the original keys of the home. How awesome!

 

A bullet was dug out of the front door during renovation. It’s assumed that it came from a carpetbagger’s gun during a riot…According to Merriam-Webster online, a carpetbagger was, “A Northerner in the South after the American Civil War usually seeking private gain under the reconstruction of governments.”  They carried all of their belongings in carpet bags, hence the name “carpetbaggers”!

Whitehall has the original radiators (which work)…this particular one in the dining room caught my eye because it has a bread warmer in it!

Here are a few interesting facts I learned about Whitehall while visiting there:

  • The house was originally insulated with horse hair.
  • Closets were added in the 1960s, and prior to that ginormous wardrobes were used because all rooms were taxed…and closets were considered rooms.
  • The current master bedroom was once the ballroom.
  • Upcyling has been around for a really long time…a piano was converted into a desk…and another piano was made into a table!

My family and I strolled on to the next stop on our pilgrimage journey, Colonnade Garden. The garden was built in the 1860s, and the current owners are Dr. and Mrs. Ryan Hill. The garden was very classy with a Southern flair.

The last stop on our adventure was Rosewood Manor. Rosewood was constructed in 1835, and it’s current owners are Mr. and Mrs. Dewitt Hicks…If you are a fan of antique porcelain then go here! If you’re clumsy…this is not the place for you!

Mrs. Hicks has an excessive, astronomical, staggering…(you would not want to stagger here!) collection of antique porcelain. Rosewood Manor is a showcase for what is probably one of the world’s largest collections of porcelain…I don’t mean to dwell on the word porcelain…it is something you have to see for yourself to understand….

My experience at the 72nd Annual Columbus Spring Pilgrimage was quite memorable, and I encourage all of you to make your own pilgrimage to Columbus, Mississippi next spring!

Check out Columbus, Mississippi online at www.columbus-ms.org

The next blog will be….*drum roll*…..wait for ittttttttt(Psych quote)……THRIFT STORE FINDS! YAYY!! I am very very VERY excited to share this thrifty find with y’all! So stay tuned to the VIP blog to see what nifty find I found while in Meridian, Mississippi! Speaking of Meridian….My family gained a new member today! Ella Ryleigh Williams, daughter of my cousin Melanie Eaves Williams…Ella is so precious, and I know my Paw Riley is proud to have her named after him:) I just love my Paw Riley sooo much! He is just like the coolest grandpa ever!

Love&Hugs

Abby Hat.

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Columbus Pilgrimage 2012- Part 1:

This year marks the 72nd Annual Columbus Spring Pilgrimage which is a spectacular event that displays the most glorious and authentic antebellum homes in the South. It was so delightful to see the men, women, and children all dressed in time period attire.

It was a lovely experience that I want to share with y’all! I would also like to thank Nancy Carpenter for her kindness and hospitality! Nancy Carpenter is the Columbus/Lowndes Convention and Visitors Bureau Executive Director, Columbus Cultural Heritage Foundation Executive Director, and the Director of the Columbus Spring Pilgrimage. Miss Nancy was soo darling to my mom, dad, and me!

I’d like to give a shout-out to all the super sweet people I met while attending the Pilgrimage! They were all so precious and excited to have a blogger visiting and reporting about the awesomeness of their historical homes and city! It made me feel so special and welcome:)

I encourage you to go and see these pulchritudinous homes for yourself! There is still time to attend the Columbus Spring Pilgrimage because it doesn’t end until April 7.

Twelve Gables was the first home we visited, and is located within walking distance from the Tennessee Williams Home and Welcome Center. It was a beautiful day for a nice little stroll with the family.

Me and Mrs. Ray Gildea Jr., the owner of the home Twelve Gables. Mrs. Gildea is an adorable story teller with a true passion for the history of her home! I loved her warm welcome and background story of the home Twelve Gables.

Twelve Gables is known for being the gathering place of local women who in 1866 planned a decoration day for the graves of the Confederate soldiers in Friendship Cemetery. "An early memorial ceremony honoring the Civil War soldiers buried in Friendship Cemetery has been credited as the forerunner of the modern Memorial Day." (http://www.thecityofcolumbusms.org/primary.asp?t=9&p=68) According to legend, one woman suggested that they put flowers on Union soldiers graves because they were also someone's sons.

A few cool facts that I learned about Twelve Gables while visiting it:

  • The facade of the home has the same carved Ashlar pattern as Mount Vernon.
  • The home is insulated with cedar chips.
  • I learned that suitors’ calling cards were quite interesting…I’m afraid my dad may have gotten some ideas…

I love the birds on this wallpaper, and the green because it is one of my VIP colors:)

Is there anything better than blue and white together??? I'm feeling outfit inspiration...

This Flowers Dictionary is by a Lady because women of that era were not allowed to put their names on books. This dictionary is located at the Twelve Gables home.

One of the upstairs bedrooms in Twelve Gables. The rug is absolutely gorgeous!

How cute:)

People from here, yonder, and everywhere were at the home tours on Saturday, March 31!

My parents and I then continued our stroll several blocks to White Arches. Along the way, I encountered squirrels frolicking, bees buzzing, birds chirping, people enjoying the carriage rides and double-decker bus tour, and other charming historical homes.

Me outside White Arches which was built in 1857. The current owners are Mr. and Mrs. Dick Leike.

My favorite thing about this edifice is the “tower” which is really a cupola… inside there are stairs leading to a small room and observation deck which was used by the women looking for their husbands returing from the War Between the States…many of these women descended the stairs as widows…that is how it became known as “the widow’s walk”.  The porch ceilings of this home are painted sky blue in order to keep insects and birds from building nests…this is the idea my dad really needs to take home!

The crowds outside White Arches learning about the history of the home.

The architecture of White Arches is called "Columbus Eclectic" which is a combination of Greek Revival, Gothic, and Italianate. The details and craftmanship of White Arches is inexplicable!

The front door entrance is surrounded by red Venetian glass which took gold to make and represents wealth. The home has time period furnishings, Stanton Hall fabric pattern (as in Natchez, Mississippi), and suprisingly modern amenities like an incredible bath that was created from a porch. A cool factoid is the private balcony of the blue bedroom, which was originally General Harris’s daughter’s room, has no outside handles on the doors to prevent intruders and especially suitors from entering…I am sure…once again, my dad was given a brilliant idea!

Me and Mrs. Leike, such a super sweet lady and dressed so darling!

The last stop on the Yellow Tour was Rosedale…I do not recommend walking to Rosedale…even though some of the tourists did. My family and I used the drive as a perfect time for a water break…and a chance to cool down from the mid 80s temperature.

Rosedale, consisting of approximately 500,000 handmade bricks is furnished with Rococo Revival and Renaissance furnishings. Mr. and Mrs. Imes, the current owners, hired an architect to restore this antebellum home to its original glory. Some say that Rosedale is named after the rose that is carved into the mantel in the ladies’ parlor.  Rosedale has the most fabulous faux painting ever! Some of the baseboards and mantels were painted to look like marble and fine wood…I am still not convinced that they were painted:) One of the coolest features of the home is the Gib windows which open to allow not only ventilation, but walk through access to the porch. Rosedale houses an extensive collection of John Henry Belter furnishings.

Rosedale was built in 1856 and the current owners are Mr. and Mrs. Gene Imes.

Children playing outside of Rosedale.

This was only the first three homes that we toured…my next blog will contain the Blue Tour places which are Whitehall, Rosewood Manor and Gardens, and Colonnade Garden.

While at the Columbus Pilgrimage, I visited a vintage store called The Attic! It is so AWESOME! I could spend all day in there just trying on and picking out things!

In a later blog, I will be showing you the vintage finds I purchased from The Attic!

To follow The Attic on facebook, visit http://www.facebook.com/#!/Atticville 

To learn more about Columbus and the Pilgrimage, visit http://www.thecityofcolumbusms.org/index.asp & http://www.columbus-ms.org

IMPORTANT: If you are NOT following me on TWITTER and INSTAGRAM please do so to keep up with me while I’m on the go!

Feel free to leave comments or suggestions…..

Thanks&Hugs

Abby Hathorn

 

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